Archive for Catherine Castel

The Ravishing Repertoire of Jean Rollin at SEQUART ORGANIZATION

Posted in France, movies with tags , , , , , , , on August 9, 2015 by goregirl

Harry at Sequart Organization asked me if I would be interested in submitting a post of my choosing. My immediate reaction was Jean Rollin. Below is my final few sentences from this piece:

“Prior to 2013 I had only seen a handful of Jean Rollin films. In July of 2013 I did a list of my favorite five, at the time I had seen seventeen of his films; I have now seen nearly double that. I now count Jean Rollin among my favorite directors; a man whose work is as robust and beautiful as a newly bloomed rose. The ravishing repertoire of Jean Rollin deserves recognition and for those of us who love him his iron rose shall never wilt.”

To read my full post The Ravishing Repertoire of Jean Rollin click here.

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LIPS OF BLOOD (1975) – The Dungeon Review!

Posted in France, horror, Jean Rollin, movies with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 26, 2013 by goregirl

It is really difficult to review a Jean Rollin film and not throw around words like dreamy, haunting and ethereal. These reviews are going to feel more than a touch redundant by the time I get the Rollin out of my system. Lips Of Blood is a vampire film and the most traditional of the four Rollin films I have watched in the last couple of weeks. Vampires bite necks, drink blood and die from stakes to the heart. Lips of Blood takes place in modern-day 1970s. The central character Frédéric is fully immersed in the modern world as we meet him at a party for the launch of a new perfume. The place Frédéric is eventually led to seemed like it belonged to another time; some place ancient and gothic; it felt like a dream. Yes. That word…dream, it is just so very apt.

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A picture used in a perfume ad sparks a childhood memory in Frédéric. He recalls meeting a beautiful woman dressed in white as a child. The woman gives him shelter where he sleeps for a while. The woman wakes him some time later and sends him off to his worried mother. Frédéric locks the gate behind him promising to return. Frédéric questions his mother about the events who attempts to convince him that they never occurred. He believes the woman may dwell there still and seeks to find the location in the photograph. He arranges to meet the photographer only to discover she has been paid to stay quiet. Jennifer the woman in his vision begins appearing to him and he is soon embarking on a journey to find her. Along the way he awakens four female vampires and attracts the attention of some unsavoury sorts who want to prevent him from accomplishing his task.

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This was my third viewing of Lips of Blood; clearly I am fond of the film. Technically speaking the film is not without flaws especially in the horror department. The vampire fangs are pretty corny and appear to be giving the actresses wearing them some difficulty. The gore is little more than some vivid red blood splashed about here and there. Yet I would not change a thing about it. While lacking gore the kill scenes are all stylish and appealing. I thought the bats in the coffins were a real nice touch too. Four vampire women who never utter a word; a blond and a brunette in sheer gowns and twin sisters. Working in pairs or all four ascending on a single victim; the wind blowing their hair and billowy gowns. Rollin knows how to make death pretty. Lips of Blood however is really Frédéric and Jennifer’s story.

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The story features some lovely flourishes and has a romantic tone about it. Frédéric’s childhood meeting with Jennifer was a brief encounter that he had erased from his mind completely. Forgotten no doubt with some assistance from his mother. His mother began acting strangely after he told her about his memory. It is apparent that mother knows more than she is letting on. Jennifer could not appear to Frédéric until he remembered her on his own. When she does materialize she keeps her distance. She first appears to Frédéric while he is inside a movie theatre. The theatre featured a large poster for Jean Rollin’s The Nude Vampire; it was a really beautiful and surreal scene. The whole bloody thing is full of beautiful surreal scenes not to mention a breath-taking finale! It ranks as one of my favourite finales in a vampire film.

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It would not be a Jean Rollin film if it wasn’t loaded with attractive women and copious amounts of nudity. Lips of Blood features lovely lasses aplenty including twin sisters Catherine and Marie-Pierre Castel. Frédéric is up to his armpits in women! Women are hanging off of him at the perfume launch as an over-bearing mother lurks nearby. Jennifer is quite unlike any of the women in his life. Jean-Loup Philippe is strong as Frédéric and it is easy to see how he could be bewitched by the fresh-faced and lovely Annie Belle who plays Jennifer.

lips of blood4Two female vampires.

lips of bloodCatherine and Marie-Pierre Castel as vampire sisters.

lips of blood8Jennifer and Frédéric on the beach.

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Lips of Blood’s wonderfully haunting and deliciously sexy gothic vibe, drips with atmosphere and features a great jazzy score. Like every Rollin film I’ve reviewed thus far the locations and sets are amazing and add so much to the look and feel of his films. And the beach. Oh how Rollin loves his beach. Several of his films feature not only a finale on the beach but one particular stretch of beach that features a long fence. Lips of Blood is like a fairy tale for adults that features a vampire instead of a princess. My highest of recommendations; a perfect score.

Dungeon Rating: 5/5

Directed By: Jean Rollin

Starring: Jean-Loup Philippe, Annie Belle, Natalie Perrey, Martine Grimaud, Catherine Castel, Marie-Pierre Castel, Helene Maguin, Anita Berglund, Claudine Beccarie, Beatrice Harnois, Sylvia Bourdon

Goregirl’s Dungeon on YouTube: Yvon Gerault – Blue Doll Baroque

Posted in France, Goregirl's Dungeon on YouTube, horror, Jean Rollin, movies with tags , , , , , , , , on May 19, 2013 by goregirl

Yvon Gerault – Blue Doll Baroque from Jean Rollin’s 1970 film The Nude Vampire with a Marie-Pierre and Catherine Castel slideshow.

THE NUDE VAMPIRE (1970) – The Dungeon Review!

Posted in France, Jean Rollin, movies with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 5, 2013 by goregirl

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I watched Jean Rollin’s The Iron Rose for the first time quite recently and loved it. Had I seen The Iron Rose when I did my 1970s top ten lists it definitely would have made the top ten for 1973. I’ve been excited to check out more 70s Rollin; re-watch some titles and discover new ones. I thought I would start the journey with one I had never seen; The Nude Vampire, one of Rollin’s earliest works.

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A strange evening encounter with a beautiful woman inspires Pierre to do some investigating. Pierre learns his father Georges has kidnapped the woman believing she is a vampire. She has been kept a prisoner in hopes of discovering the key to her immortality. Pierre is immersed into a dreamy world of suicide cults, animal masks, foxy broads in crazy costumes and mad science,

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The supernatural and science meet again! I loved the mixing of themes here. We’ve got elites, cults, science, vampirism,; a touch convoluted but enthralling all the same. Paced to compliment its dream-like visuals every set piece and location is beautiful and stylish and the costumes are utterly superb. I love the copious use of hoods and masks; particularly the animals masks; which were wonderfully folky, creepy and elaborate. Its jazzy little score is the perfect accompaniment. Of course one cannot talk about a Jean Rollin film and not mention the lovely ladies and their various states of undress. The women as always are sexy and stunning and particularly fun eye-candy are Rollin regulars the Castel twins Catherine and Marie-Pierre. Caroline Cartier who plays the titular nude vampire is the story’s motivation and doesn’t speak a word. As a matter of fact there are several long lingering dreamy scenes without dialog that were simply hypnotic, Cartier is a pleasure to look at. The two central male characters are also strong, Oliver Rollin plays the handsome and likable Pierre Radamante and Maurice Lemaître plays Georges Radamante the icy businessman to a T.

naked vampire2Hood-wearing scientists.

the nude vampire2No science lab is complete without multi-colored liquid filled vessels.

the nude vampire4The suicide cult holds a black-tie affair where some lucky member will be chosen to shoot themselves in the head.

the nude vampire5I can’t say enough about the amazing costuming in The Nude Vampire. There were a million other screenshots I could have put here as every costume in the film is worth posting; but I do love me a cultiesque ensemble.

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I love symmetrical shots like this. The twins are each holding large torches and place them down and walk through doors in perfect uniform fashion. It is one of many visually arresting moments in The Nude Vampire.

the nude vampire7A nifty shot of twins Marie-Pierre and Catherine. They walk around in a fog functioning as servants to the Radamante men. A lot of films could be made better by adding sexy wandering twins in ginchy outfits.

nude vampireAn unforgettable finale on the beach. Beautiful Caroline Cartier in a gauzy orange getup. Rollin does love the beach.

The Nude Vampire’s dreamy visuals, amazing sets, fantastic costumes, nifty score, and intriguing albeit convoluted plot is a sexy, surreal treat. I would have liked more emphasis on the “horror” but otherwise The Nude Vampire is delectable. Highly recommended.

Dungeon Rating: 4/5

Directed By: Jean Rollin

Starring: Maurice Lemaître, Caroline Cartier, Ly Lestrong, Bernard Musson, Jean Aron, Ursule Pauly, Catherine Castel, Marie-Pierre Castel, Michel Delahaye, Pascal Fardoulis, Paul Bisciglia, Olivier Rollin